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La Palabra del Día: Escupir (Winner: Porcupine)

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La Palabra del Día: Escupir (Winner: Porcupine)

Postby Pesta » Mon May 15, 2017 7:32 am

Escupir - Verb - To spit


Use the word of the day, or one of the related word(s), as you prefer.

Post your sentences in Spanish and English, then vote for the ones you like. The best answer will be chosen tomorrow.

Any help with corrections both in English and in Spanish, are highly appreciated! :thankyou

Please ask any grammar questions or anything you don't understand about the corrections on the vocabulary and grammar category! 8-)

Mi propuesta: El pez arquero captura los insectos por escupiendo el agua en ellos caza insectos escupiéndoles agua.

..caza insectos escupiéndoles agua. :buzo5


Sorprendente ese pez, no había oido hablar de él...genial :cheers: :buzo5


I used to wonder whether the verb infinitive or gerundio should be used there after "por". Here is a good article explaining when to use which: por+infinitivo vs por + gerundio However, I wonder whether that should be "a" (at) rather than "en" (on)...escupiendole agua a ellos...notice the singular le when referring to plural ellos, a common Spanish usage... Here is an article that states it in many different ways...I like...que dispara un chorro de agua contra ellos...of interest...
Miley Cyrus escupiéndole agua a sus fans
  qfreed


The Archerfish catches insects by spitting water at them.

¡Gracias, Q y Heidita!   Pesta

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Re: La Palabra del Día: Escupir

Postby porcupine7 » Mon May 15, 2017 10:08 am

Image


Hay un proverbio: "Al que al cielo escupe en la cara le cae " y este dibujo le demuestra.

...lo demuestra...the leísmo is used with people (usually males). You want the accusative case (d.o.) pronoun here. In the proverb the "le" (dative case pronoun (i.o.) refers back to "el que" (he who/the one who)...To him who to/at the sky spits; in his (le) face it falls. The "it" is implied by the person of the verb (cae). The "le" in the proverb is a dative of interest, ethical dative or one other of the confusing dative usages and often ends up being translated as a possessive adjective in English...in the face (whose face...le's/el que's face)   qfreed



There is a proverb: "To him who spits at the sky in the face it falls" and this drawing shows it.
Thanks Qfreed.P.  

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Re: La Palabra del Día: Escupir

Postby qfreed » Mon May 15, 2017 6:45 pm

Don't mince words. Spit it out. (Don't beat around the bush. Get to it. Say what's on your mind.)

No hables con rodeos (No tengas pelos en la lengua). Escúpelo. (desembucha) (vayas Vete al grano). :buzo5

Thank you for the correction...Q

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Re: La Palabra del Día: Escupir

Postby Heidita » Tue May 16, 2017 5:58 pm

Image

sin comentarios :biggrin

Very clever!   qfreed
I appreciate all English corrections, especially on style! :)
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Re: La Palabra del Día: Escupir (Winner: Porcupine)

Postby Pesta » Fri May 19, 2017 11:23 am

And the winner is:


¡Porcupine7!

¡Felicidades!

Image

porcupine7 wrote:Image


Hay un proverbio: "Al que al cielo escupe en la cara le cae " y este dibujo le demuestra.

...lo demuestra...the leísmo is used with people (usually males). You want the accusative case (d.o.) pronoun here. In the proverb the "le" (dative case pronoun (i.o.) refers back to "el que" (he who/the one who)...To him who to/at the sky spits; in his (le) face it falls. The "it" is implied by the person of the verb (cae). The "le" in the proverb is a dative of interest, ethical dative or one other of the confusing dative usages and often ends up being translated as a possessive adjective in English...in the face (whose face...le's/el que's face)   qfreed



There is a proverb: "To him who spits at the sky in the face it falls" and this drawing shows it.
Thanks Qfreed.P.  
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