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escorromoñar

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escorromoñar

Postby saffron » Sat May 13, 2017 6:08 pm

The above was on a tweet from the Spanish Police which also referred to an article in 20 minutos. I know it is probably slang.

¿Eres de los que #camina por la calle con el - sin prestar atención? Cuidado, ¡MIRA! ¡Que te vas a escorromoñar!

http://www.20minutos.es/noticia/3031458/0/el-movil-es-un-peligro-para-los-peatones/

Image

I've edited out the emoji's - after el was a phone.



edit Link to article changed thanks to Q's astuteness :)
corrections welcomed to my Spanish or English
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Re: escorromoñar

Postby qfreed » Sat May 13, 2017 7:41 pm

I would imagine that like many words its meaning may vary with context, but here is one translation:
escorromoñarse Sig:
caerse , meterse un tortazo


the meterse un tortazo goes along with this image that you find when googling escorromoñar.
Image

But I found another definition (here ) that listed a bunch of Spanish synonyms like caerse, desplomarse, etc., so it can mean to fall down, collapse, stumble, tumble, trip, etc.
es·co·rro·mo·ñar·se Verb
Translate "escorromoñarse" to English: fall down
Spanish Synonyms of "escorromoñarse": caer, caer al suelo, caerse, caerse al suelo, desplomarse, venirse abajo, venirse al suelo
Define meaning of "escorromoñarse": Moverse un cuerpo de arriba abajo por su propio peso y la atracción de la fuerza de la gravedad.; Perder un cuerpo el equilibrio hasta dar en el suelo o en cosa firme que lo detenga.


Just to mention it, when I tried to follow your 20 Minutes link, it takes you to their site, but not to the specific article so I don't know what context it is being used in. It seems to be a sports article...perhaps a soccer player falling or slipping/tripping while chasing or attempting to kick the ball?

In the tweet about attempting to cross the street while looking at your phone? Could it be that "stumble" or "fall down", perhaps after colliding with another pedestrian using the crosswalk while being distracted by looking at your phone, was the context?

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Re: escorromoñar

Postby qfreed » Mon May 15, 2017 12:12 am

...o en cosa firme que lo detenga.


Image

I have a feeling that one of the connotations of this word is abruptly, suddenly, with force. One of the translations I ran across that used it in the context of falling was "to plummet". Same connotations as with words like " to collapse".

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Re: escorromoñar

Postby Heidita » Mon May 15, 2017 7:40 pm

10 'palabros' de padres que los jóvenes ya no reconocen

http://www.losreplicantes.com/articulos ... reconocen/

Es sinónimo de 'te estampo' o 'te estrello'

Uno de sus 'palabros' favoritos es "escorromocho/ño", algo que seguro has escuchado y siempre funciona en forma de amenaza. En lugar del "te voy a meter dos yoyas que te van a temblar las orejas", es más habitual el "te pego una hostia que te escorromocho". No hay una acepción correcta ya que no está registrado en la RAE, pero vendría a asemejarse a que te estrello, que te estampo o cosas por el estilo. No es nada bueno, mejor que no te lo digan.


No es nada común por aquí.
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Re: escorromoñar

Postby Heidita » Mon May 15, 2017 7:43 pm

Se ve que es común por esa zona.

http://wiki.verbix.com/Verbs/SpanishAragon
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